Archive for the ‘News & Updates’ Category

IPv6 User Group Meeting

Thursday, January 30th, 2014
Mar ’14
12
5:30 pm

Please join us for an IPv6 User Group meeting on March 12th at GTRI downtown Denver.  Topics covered include IPv6 addressing.

Pizza and drinks will be available.  Parking validation available for attendees.

A Webex will be available for for remote participants. Click here for Webex details.

Address:

GTRI
990 S. Broadway Suite 300
Denver CO, 80209

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Input Requested for 2014 NA IPv6 Summit Location

Monday, May 13th, 2013

 

As we begin work on the 2014 North American IPv6 Summit we would like to know your thoughts on the location.  Traditionally the event is hosted in Denver, Colorado.  Please review the list of cities below and select your choice for a possible location in 2014.

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Denver, COWashington, D.C.Dallas, TXSan Jose, CA

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Ops Face the Era of Hybrid IPv4/IPv6 Networks

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

It is impossible to identify precisely what the next steps are for the industry on IPv6 deployment because, naturally, each operator is in a different stage of its evolution, each faces a different situation in its systems, and each has its own unique priorities and goals. There are, though, general comments that can be made on the decisions that operators will face as they come closer to implementing the new addressing scheme. The first step is to recognize that the highest level decision – the agreement that dual stack approaches in which IPv4 and IPv6 run in parallel – probably was the most important. What comes next is a set of more granular and, collectively, equally vital choices on how to actually deploy this necessary new technique. The first realization that operators must make is that though the new kid on the block is IPv6, the world of IPv4 will march on well into the future. Indeed, the true end of the older addressing scheme is not in sight. The decision in the short- and medium-term is not how IPv6 will replace IPv4. It is how the two will work together in a way that the newer technique gradually supersedes the older one. “A big thing to remember is that there are two pieces that get conflated at times …. One of them is IPv6 and the other is how to keep IPv4 alive until we don’t need it, which is a long way off,” said Chris Grundemann,CableLabs’ architect for IP networks. It may seem odd to be worrying about IPv4 just as IPv6′s profile on the landscape grows. But that is the case. Operators, insiders say, must take care in measuring the IPv4 addresses supply they have against the expected need. If they seem to be falling short, plans must be set for obtaining more, perhaps even on the open market. The survivalist tendencies of IPv4 lead to a couple of other decisions. Grundemann said operators need to think about how they are going to gradually shift device management functionality to IPv6. As the IPv4 pool of devices shrinks, he said, more and more of the vital oversight tasks can be assigned to the IPv6 management platform. This gradual transition frees IPv4 addresses that formerly were devoted to management tasks. Ironically, one of the techniques that service providers of all stripes use to stretch the IPv4 soup – network address translation (NAT) – still has a big role even after the rollout of IPv6, said John Brzozowski, the chief architect for IPv6 and distinguished engineer for Comcast (NASDAQ:CMCSA). NAT, he said, will remain a primary player in its role of using a single IPv4 address to link to the devices in the home that are not IPv6-capable. Another concern is that the availability of proper hardware and software once these decisions are made. Keven Adams, the director of CMTS product management for ARRIS (NASDAQ:ARRS), agreed that there are a great many architectural decisions to be made as the industry navigates the trip from IPv4 to a hybrid IPv6/v4 and, ultimately, a pure IPv6 network. He added that operators must make sure that their vendors offer products that support the path that they have chosen and that that support extends beyond betas into the actual available products. Mediating between IPv4 and IPv6 and managing the transition is not the only issue that cable operators need to think about. Nominum, a company that focuses on IP addressing mechanics such as domain name system (DNS) and dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP), sees a challenge ahead for cable operators. In the IPv4 world, said Craig Sprosts, it is possible to amass information about every address the operator controls. This highly automated process can be used to create white lists and black lists and otherwise be used to manage how different end points are treated. For instance, a spammer could be identified by the IPv4 address. With IPv6, there are so many addresses that this approach simply won’t work, Sprosts said. New approaches – such as dynamic naming that Nominum offers – are necessary. The higher level point simply is that the number of IPv6 addresses is so much greater than IPv4 that fundamentally new approaches are necessary, at least in some cases. All of these issues must be worked through in a landscape in which the two other major stakeholders – content creators and consumer electronic equipment manufacturers – are outside the direct control of cable operators and are in various stages of readiness. That is a key issue, said Grundemann. “If I am an operator rolling out new services, I have to check if it is available in IPv6. If it is, I don’t have to turn up any IPv4 addresses.” The bottom line is that the industry has a gone a long way down the road toward IPv6 implementation. Clearly, however, there are significant twists and turns ahead. Carl Weinschenk is the Senior Editor of Broadband Technology Report. Reach him at carl@btreport.net. http://btreport.net/2013/04/ops-face-the-era-of-hybrid-ipv4ipv6-networks/

Internet Society Colorado Chapter and Task Force join to advance IPv6

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

DENVER – The Internet Society Colorado Chapter and the Rocky Mountain Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Task Force have joined to advance deployment of IPv6 by organizing INET Denver, which is co-locating with the 2013 North American IPv6 Summit in Denver on April 17-19.

United in the goal of preserving the growth and development of the global Internet, the Internet Society and the RMv6TF said they will leverage both events in Denver to spread awareness and educate the industry on the importance of adopting IPv6.

“As IPv4 is running out of IP addresses to support the explosive number of devices connecting to the Internet, it is critical that the world embrace IPv6 as the new normal,” said Scott Hogg, RMv6TF chair emeritus.

“IPv6, unlike its predecessor IPv4, essentially has an unlimited number of IP addresses available, so businesses across the globe can continue to use the Internet as a primary vehicle for collaboration, commerce and innovation.”

“INET Denver: IPv4 Exhaustion and the Path to IPv6” will bring together top industry experts with professionals in the networking field to discuss the depletion of IPv4 in the market and the TCO of IPv6.

For more information, visit www.internetsociety.org or www.RMv6TF.org.

http://innovationews.com/innovation-news-releases/internet-society-colorado-chapter-and-task-force-join-to-advance-adoption-of-ipv6/

Press Release: IPv6 Adoption Critical for the Preservation and Growth of the Internet

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 9, 2013

 

IPv6 Adoption Critical for the Preservation and Growth of the Internet

The Internet Society and the Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force unify events in Denver to increase IPv6 adoption rate

(DENVER) – The number of available Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addresses is declining rapidly and will soon leave businesses and individuals worldwide who have not yet adopted the new IPv6 protocol with limited options for connecting new devices to the global Internet.

To help ensure this does not happen, the Internet Society Colorado Chapter and the Rocky Mountain Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Task Force (RMv6TF) have joined forces to advance deployment of IPv6. On April 17, 2013, the Internet Society-organized INET Denver will co-locate with the 2013 North American IPv6 Summit in Denver, Colorado, creating the largest IPv6-focused event in North America this year.

United in the goal to preserve the growth and development of the global Internet, the world’s largest platform of global communication and commerce, the Internet Society and the RMv6TF will leverage both events in Denver to spread awareness and educate the industry on the importance of the adoption of IPv6.

 

“As IPv4 is rapidly running out of IP addresses to support the explosive number of devices connecting to the Internet, it is critical that the world embrace IPv6 as the new normal,” said Scott Hogg, Chair-Emeritus, RMv6T. “IPv6, unlike its predecessor IPv4, essentially has an unlimited number of IP addresses available, so businesses across the globe can continue to use the Internet as a primary vehicle for collaboration, commerce, and innovation.”

 

INET Denver: IPv4 Exhaustion and the Path to IPv6 brings together top industry experts with professionals in the networking field to discuss the depletion of IPv4 in the market and the TCO of IPv6. A compelling variety of sessions and panels will give industry professionals a chance to understand why the time to move to IPv6 is now. Speakers at INET Denver feature a wide range of organizations successfully deploying IPv6, including Richard Jimmerson, Director of the Internet Society’s Deploy360 Programme, which provides real-world deployment information for key Internet technologies such as IPv6 and DNSSEC.

 

Remarking on the importance of deploying new technologies such as IPv6, Jimmerson said, “In the last 15 years, the Internet has completely changed the way the world conducts business. Nothing is more important to your business continuity than paying attention to changes in the core Internet protocols.”

 

Discounted registration is available to INET Denver for Internet Society members and the entire event will be streamed live for those unable to attend in person. For registration and more information, see: http://www.internetsociety.org/events/inet-denver.

 

To further the education and awareness gained from INET Denver, the North American IPv6 Summit will continue the momentum with two days of discussions, panels, and workshops, giving network professionals the opportunity to gain in-depth knowledge on what it takes to transition to IPv6. Discussions will include hot topics around BYOD, the Do’s and Don’ts of IPv6 Transitions, Enterprise Deployments and overall best practices, with powerful keynotes from Latif Ladid, President, IPv6 Forum and Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist Vint Cerf.

 

Additionally, the conference will also host a full day of pre-conference tutorials at a small additional fee for attendees looking for training and development on IPv6. An Introduction course, Security Course, and Advanced training class are offered.  Registration for tutorials is open and will take place on April 17, 2013.

About the Internet Society

The Internet Society is the trusted independent source for Internet information and thought leadership from around the world. With its principled vision and substantial technological foundation, the Internet Society promotes open dialogue on Internet policy, technology, and future development among users, companies, governments, and other organizations. Working with its members and Chapters around the world, the Internet Society enables the continued evolution and growth of the Internet for everyone. For more information, see: http://www.internetsociety.org

 

About The Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force

Dedicated to the advancement and adoption of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), the Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force (RMv6TF) works to educate the community on IPv6 and its benefits. As a sub-chapter of the North American IPv6 Task Force, the organization primarily hosts local IPv6-focused events to promote the use of IPv6 within the Rocky Mountain region. The RMv6TF is a non-profit/tax-exempt organization that industry and government can look to for guidance on IPv6 transition information and advice about best practices and solutions involving IPv6. For more information, visit www.RMv6TF.org.

 

 

Infoblox White Paper: IPv6 Addressing Basics

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Infoblox, the Platinum Sponsor of the 2013 North American IPv6 Summit provides this white paper on IPv6 Addressing Basics.

Infoblox-whitepaper-IPv6-addressing-plan-basic-US-letter

HP White Paper: Prepare Today for Tomorrow’s IPv6 World

Monday, March 25th, 2013

HP, a Gold Sponsor of the 2013 North American IPv6 Summit, white paper on preparing for IPv6.

Prepare Today for Tomorrow’s IPv6 World – HP

Press Release: 2013 IPv6 Summit Keynote: The Big Shift To IPv6 Is On By Default

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 20, 2013

 

2013 IPv6 Summit Keynote: The Big Shift To IPv6 Is On By Default

Industry Leading Speaker Lineup Explains Why IPv6 Adoption
Imperative for Continued E-Commerce

 (DENVER) – The Rocky Mountain Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Task Force (RMv6TF), in conjunction with Regional North America IPv6 Task Forces, announced keynote speakers for the upcoming North American IPv6 Summit in Denver on April 17-19, will include Latif Ladid, President, IPv6 Forum and Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist Vint Cerf.

This year’s keynote covered by Ladid and Cerf explains why the big shift to IPv6 Internet is on by default. “When a protocol is on by default,” explains Ladid, “vendor readiness, network readiness, and service enablement become critical. The issue now is can IPv6 be treated like IPv4. The service providers with advanced deployment experiences have discovered that IPv6 is a totally different networking paradigm.”

Cerf, who is recognized as one of “the fathers of the Internet” will address the audience via video from Silicon Valley. Cerf will discuss The Adoption of the Internet of Things, and how the Internet impacts our daily life with the plethora of new services and how security and privacy should be managed.

Additionally, the speaker lineup covers compelling trends and discoveries made regarding IPv6 deployments, and looks closely at the highly discussed topic of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), one of the foremost reasons for the essential transition to IPv6.  Featured keynote speakers will address topics including the Do’s and Don’ts of IPv6 Transitions, Enterprise Deployments and overall best practices.

“This year’s speaker lineup offer up compelling information and insights on the transition to IPv6,” said Scott Hogg, Chair-Emeritus, RMv6T. “The world is experiencing an explosion of IP connected devices through BYOD in business as well as homes. There are simply not enough IP addresses to sustain commerce as we know it on the IPv4 platform. This lineup of speakers will help ensure the world is ready.”

Hogg added, “In time, every business, large and small who wants to continue to conduct business over the Internet will have to migrate to IPv6. It’s imperative that those managing that transition know how to do it fast, and as seamlessly as possible.”

The speaker list and agenda are now available. Registration for the conference is open to anyone who would like to attend. A newly added Government panel will look at current IPv6 adoption levels in the US Government, learn how real deployments are being impacted and hear how some government agencies are making the most of the IPv6 transition process. This half-day session will also be available to those who cannot attend in-person via Webex.

Additionally, the conference will also host a full day of pre-conference tutorials at a small additional fee for attendees looking for training and development on IPv6. An Introduction course, Security Course and Advanced training class are offered.  Registration for tutorials is open and will take place on April 17, 2013.

About The Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force

Dedicated to the advancement and adoption of Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), the Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force (RMv6TF) works to educate the community on IPv6 and its benefits. As a sub-chapter of the North American IPv6 Task Force, the organization primarily hosts local IPv6-focused events to promote the use of IPv6 within the Rocky Mountain region. The RMv6TF is a non-profit/tax-exempt organization that industry and government can look to for guidance on IPv6 transition information and advice about best practices and solutions involving IPv6. For more information, visit www.RMv6TF.org.

Government Panel offered at NA IPv6 Summit

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013
Apr ’13
19
8:45 am

The North American IPv6 Summit is pleased to add a Government Panel to the agenda this year.

Tales from the Edge: IPv6 Adoption in US Government will focus on how after six months beyond the due date for OMB 2012 IPv6 compliance, many US Government entities still struggle to complete major adoption milestones.  But does the fault lie with the agencies?  With the IT vendor community?  Service providers?  Or an un-compelling business case?  This half-day session will explore these issues, provide  insight into current adoption levels in the US Government, learn how real deployments are being impacted by IPv6 support at large, and hear how some government agencies are making the most of the IPv6 transition process.

This session is offered to conference attendees as a break-out option on Friday, April 19th, 2013 and will be held in Pikes Peak at the Grand Hyatt in Denver, CO.  Additionally, this session is available via Webex at no charge.  To register for the Webex, please fill out the form below and information will be sent directly to you.

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A10 Networks White Paper: The End of IPv4? Migration paths to IPv6

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

A10 Networks, a sponsor of the 2013 North American IPv6 Summit provides this white paper on Migration paths to IPv6.

The End of IPv4? Migration paths to IPv6